Skip to Main Content
B
Overall Niche Grade
How are grades calculated?
  1. Public Schools
    C+
  2. Crime & Safety
    NG
  3. Housing
    C-
  4. Nightlife
    B
  5. Good for Families
    B-
  6. Diversity
    A+
  7. Jobs
    C
  8. Weather
    A+
  9. Cost of Living
    C-
  10. Health & Fitness
    A
  11. Outdoor Activities
    A-
  12. Commute
    A-
Wailuku is a town in Hawaii with a population of 17,354. Wailuku is in Maui County. Living in Wailuku offers residents a dense suburban feel and most residents own their homes. In Wailuku there are a lot of parks. Many families and young professionals live in Wailuku and residents tend to be liberal.

Real Estate

Median Home Value
$549,600
National
$184,700
Median Rent
$1,218
National
$949
Area Feel
Dense Suburban
Rent vs. Own
  • Rent
    42%
  • Own
    58%
Sponsored Mortgage Options for Wailuku
Get Rates
  • $0 Lender Fee on Home Loans Limited Time Only
  • Biggest Home Loan Sale Ever. Low interest rates. Get a quote today!
Niche may be compensated by the third party lenders and others who place ads on the website. Niche is not a lender and does not endorse the products of these advertisers. Fees that Niche receives for ads do not affect the terms you may be offered by the lender you choose. There are many additional borrowing options available.

Wailuku Rankings

Niche ranks thousands of places to live based on key statistics from the U.S. Census and and expert insights.

Crime & Safety

Crime & Safety
NG
Based on violent and property crime rates.
Violent Crimes
  • Calculated annually per 100,000 residents
National
  • Assault
    282.7
  • Murder
    6.1
  • Rape
    40.7
  • Robbery
    135.5
Property Crimes
  • Calculated annually per 100,000 residents
National
  • Burglary
    500.1
  • Theft
    2,042.8
  • Motor Vehicle Theft
    284

Residents

Diversity
A+
Based on ethnic and economic diversity.
Age
  • <10 years
    15%
  • 10-17 years
    8%
  • 18-24 years
    8%
  • 25-34 years
    13%
  • 35-44 years
    13%
  • 45-54 years
    14%
  • 55-64 years
    13%
  • 65+ years
    16%
Education Levels
National
  • Master's degree or higher
    10%
    12%
  • Bachelor's degree
    17%
    19%
  • Some college or associate's degree
    40%
    29%
  • High school diploma or equivalent
    27%
    28%
  • Less than high school diploma
    7%
    13%

Working in Wailuku

Jobs
C
Based on employment rates, job and business growth, and cost of living.
Median Household Income
$71,768
National
$55,322
Places like Wailuku
More

Wailuku Reviews

20 reviews
All Categories
Growing up in Wailuku was a special place. There is a strong sense of community and collaboration between residents in neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces. This town was a very culturally diverse area that exemplified the spirit of aloha. Oftentimes, small businesses compete with each other for business, creating a competitive business environment. What I loved about Wailuku was that there was an underlying sense of support and cooperation in the community. Small businesses worked to support each other, often buying products from each other to showcase in their products or store. For example, Kumu farms would grow produce that the Surfing Goat Dairy Farm would use in their products to be sold at various hotels and businesses. This sense of community and aloha truly created a harmonious culture that makes me proud to be a resident of Wailuku.
Start Your Review of Wailuku
Rate It!
Wailuku is a great place to live. Many common, convenient stores, such as Longs's Drugs, Safeway, and Foodland, are all within a fifteen minute drive. All the schools are close to each other, so I often see elementary or middle school students walking with the friends or siblings to school or to the aforementioned stores to pick up snacks. People are extremely friendly in general. I believe that is just a normal part of living in Hawaii. The only problem I am aware of is the growing homeless population. Their presence make walking around Wailuku town at night an unpleasant and worrisome activity, except on First Friday night in which large crowds, loud music, and police presence keep any suspicious people in check.
I like to be in the place of my roots, protecting it from the damages of corporate exploitation. Over exploitation and tourism have left a heavy impact upon our ecosystem that certainly deserves attention. In addition to our environmental concerns, the ancestral trauma combined with a biased system also needs attention. Now that we have more of our people in school, we can build more networks that better serve more demographics, reaching out to a deeper level of our community and uplifting them to a point of reintegration into modernity. A community is only as strong as its weakest points. I want to find ways to build and strengthen those points.