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C-
Overall Niche Grade
How are grades calculated?
  1. Academics
    C-
  2. Diversity
    B+
  3. Teachers
    B-
  4. College Prep
    C-
  5. Clubs & Activities
    C+
  6. Health & Safety
    C+
  7. Administration
    C
  8. Sports
    A
  9. Food
    C-
  10. Resources & Facilities
    C-
Baltimore City Public Schools is a public school district located in Baltimore, MD. It has 82,354 students in grades PK, K-12 with a student-teacher ratio of 16 to 1. According to state test scores, 17% of students are at least proficient in math and 17% in reading.
Address
200 East North Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21202
Telephone
(443) 984-2000

Baltimore City Public Schools Rankings

Niche ranks nearly 100,000 schools and districts based on statistics and millions of opinions from students and parents.

Academics

Percent Proficient - Reading
17%
Percent Proficient - Math
17%
Average Graduation Rate
71%
Average SAT
1020
2,824 responses
Average ACT
23
227 responses

Students

Diversity
B+
Based on racial and economic diversity and survey responses on school culture and diversity from students and parents.
Students
82,354
Free or Reduced Lunch
58.4%
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Teachers

Student-Teacher Ratio
16:1
National
17:1
Average Teacher Salary
$68,166
Teachers in First/Second Year
22%

Finances

Total Expenses
$1,426,977,000
Expenses Per Student
$16,699/ student
National
$12,239
Education Expenses
  • Instruction
    61%
  • Support Services
    36%
  • Other
    3%
Living in the Area
C+
Overall Niche Grade
How are grades calculated?
  1. Cost of Living
    C
  2. Good for Families
    C
  3. Housing
    D-
Median Household Income
$33,547
National
$55,322
Median Rent
$922
National
$949
Median Home Value
$188,522
National
$184,700

Baltimore City Public Schools Reviews

121 reviews
All Categories
I have been lucky enough to attend some of the best schools in Baltimore City since we don’t have to attend zoned schools, however city schools are drastically underfunded. Funding is made up from local revenue from property tax and money from the state, which has remained flat in regards to inflation since 2008. Due to the levels of concentrated poverty in Baltimore, we get very little local funding compared to wealthier counties. This leaves us at a major deficit and it shows through our lack of properly maintained school buildings. Many lack proper heat, fully functioning bathrooms and technology. Despite all this, there are some truly great schools in the district that you’re able to get into if you maintain good grades that will afford you priceless opportunities to follow your passions, which I am genuinely grateful for.
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Overall being a student in a Baltimore Pubkic School has been both triumphant and disappointing. Favoritism can be seen through the uneven funding for all extracurricular activities, for example at Western High School the Basketball team gets all the money, But when it comes to the Fine Arts department the money seems to be missing. The textbooks are falling apart and are diminishing in number as the years go on. The bathroom stalls have missing doors and some hallways have insufficient lighting. Despite all of the technicalities of the building, I believe the educational aspect of Western High School is nurturing. The majority of the teachers do their best to provide for students and prepare them for the future both academically And socially. The diverse community in western allows students to get comfortable being around people who have different backgrounds. The lunches overall are great they are nutritious and tasty.
In the 12 years I’ve spent in Bcpss I’ve noticed that schools display poor building structures. Though the students score high on standardized test they are deprived of the basic necessities needed to thrive in an educational setting. Students work hard to maintain decent grades while the school system works hard to maintain its reputation. The system should work for the kids not against them. Our world is dependent upon young and growing minds, and flourishing minds are a product of a genuinely active school system.