616 reviews
  1. Chicago, IL
  2. 4 Year
B
Overall Niche Grade
  1. Academics
    B
  2. Value
    C
  3. Diversity
    A+
  4. Campus
    A-
  5. Athletics
    NG
  6. Party Scene
    A-
  7. Professors
    B-
  8. Location
    A
  9. Dorms
    A-
  10. Campus Food
    A-
  11. Student Life
    A-
  12. Safety
    B
School of the Art Institute of Chicago is ...
Private not-for-profit
Athletic Division
Data not available
Athletic Conference
Data not available
Address
36 S Wabash
Chicago, IL 60603
Website

School of the Art Institute of Chicago Rankings

Niche rankings are based on rigorous analysis of key statistics from the U.S. Department of Education and millions of reviews.

Admissions

Acceptance Rate
69%
SAT Scores Range
Data not available
ACT Scores Range
18-28
Application Fee
$65
SAT/ACT
Required
High School GPA
Neither required nor recommended
Application Website
Will You Get In?

Test Scores and GPA for School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Cost

Net Price
$45,587/ year
National
$15,431

Average cost after financial aid for students receiving grant or scholarship aid, as reported by the college.

Net Price by Household Income
  • <$30k
    $37,018/ year
  • $30-48k
    $39,102/ year
  • $49-75k
    $40,438/ year
  • $76-110k
    $44,051/ year
  • $110k+
    $44,468/ year

Academics

Professors
B-
Based on faculty accomplishments, salary, student reviews, and additional factors.
Student Faculty Ratio
9:1
Evening Degree Programs
No
80%
of students agree that professors put a lot of effort into teaching their classes.44 responses
47%
of students agree that it is easy to get the classes they want.45 responses
36%
of students agree that the workload is easy to manage.44 responses

Majors

Students

Full-Time Enrollment
2,602Undergrads
Undergrads Over 25
9%
Pell Grant
18%
Varsity Athletes
Data not available
Poll
What one word or phrase best describes the typical student at this school?
Based on 34 responses
Report
  • Unique and creative
    35%
  • So unique they're not unique anymore
    21%
  • Variable
    18%
  • Some are pretentious, but the art makes up for it.
    9%
  • Weird
    9%
  • Weird and unique and nice and supportive
    9%

Campus Life

Freshmen Live On-Campus
86%
Poll
95%
of students say they don't have Greek life.56 responses
Poll
97%
of students say no one pays attention to varsity sports.60 responses
Poll
What one word or phrase best describes your school?
Based on 36 responses
Report
  • Conceptual and Progressive
    64%
  • Expensive, unique, conceptual, progressive
    14%
  • Expensive and somewhat elitist but unique
    11%
  • Not for everyone, but the best for me.
    8%
  • Current conceptual
    3%

After School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Median Earnings 6 Years After Graduation
$31,700/ year
National
$33,028
Graduation Rate
57%
National
47%
Employed 2 Years After Graduation
85%
National
83%
74%
of students feel confident they will find a job in their field after graduation.34 responses

School of the Art Institute of Chicago Reviews

616 reviews
All Categories
Being a transfer student from Parsons Paris to SAIC I came with a very fresh outlook to how the school functioned and the overall feeling of the school. The ambiance of the school overall is very artistic, much less corporate than what Parsons was. Facilities are amazing. Teacher are great, though sometimes I miss that some professors are not fully invested in their work outside of school. I feel that SAIC is filled with authentic fine artists, less people that see school as a path to make money but as a way to ultimately learn and grow as artists. In a way, there is something very sensible that makes SAIC unique.
There is large amount of gender and sexual diversity (majority female students, probably a large number who identify outside of the binary system that the statistics do not cover). Much art and discussion and politcs is devoted to this; I am a very left-wing person so I am completely cool with this stuff. Religion is rarely discussed, mostly atheist/agnostic if I am a reliable observer. Among American-born students the vast majority seem to be white and from suburbs/wealthier regions of liberal metropolises (New York, Seattle, Chicago, etc); there are a lot of international students, mostly from East Asia but also Europe and Latin America (most spanish speakers seem to be international rather than American Hispanics like me).

Where the school fails miserably is in economic background; I'd estimate the median income for a student's household to sit no lower than $80,000 a year; class is not really discussed as much, the school benefits financially from being closely aligned with both industry and the aflfuent families of suburbia and gentrified neighborhoods across the country. Positively, it seems possible to make friends despite class boundaries anyway, but it affects the art-making and the ability to go out often.
When looking strictly at the quality of the residence halls themselves, they're great. They're much more spacious with much more community spaces than most other schools have. No tiny rooms with bunk beds and four or more people. Plenty of room to work in your room or in the studios in the building. But, living with other first years means you're living with some ignorant, racist, close-minded, etc., people. This pretty much negates the good parts of the res halls. I'm glad they're doing more diversity and sensitivity training and offering more support for the communities who have been targeted though. I hope the problem resolves itself.
  • College Sophomore
  • 9 months ago
  • Housing